101 Magical Spells: Words of Wizardry from the World of Harry Potter (Part 3: G-J)

PART THREE: G-J

Gripping Charm
Purpose: This charm was invented in 1875. It gives the spell-caster a better grip on the target object.
Example: The quaffle ball that is used in Quidditch tournaments has a gripping Charm on it to make it easier for players to grip it one-handed. This is especially important because the Chaser needs the other hand to maneuver his/her broom.

Homorphus Charm
Word Origin: From the Latin homô (man) and English morph (to be transformed, to change shape)
Purpose: The spell used to force a werewolf back into its human form.
Example: In Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets, Gilderoy Lockhart describes how he used this spell to defeat the werewolf of Wagga Wagga. `

Imperio!
Word Origin:
From the Latin imperiosus (commanding, mighty, powerful)
Purpose: This is the incantation for The Imperius Curse, which gives the spell-caster complete control over the victim’s actions. It is also the third of the three “Unforgivable Curses” – any witch or wizard who casts this spell is sent to Azcaban Prison for life. (see Avada Kedavra! and Crucio!)
Example: In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Voldemort attempted to cast this spell on Harry, who successfully blocked it.

Impervius!
Word Origin:
From the Latin in (not) and pervius (letting things through)
Purpose: This spell makes the target object waterproof, impervious to water
Example: In Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Hermione Granger used this spell on Harry’s glasses during a rainy Quidditch match, causing them to repel water.

Incarcerous!
Word Origin:
From the Latin in- (in) and carcer (prison, an enclosed space)
Purpose: This spell is used to conjure up ropes or chains with which to bind or restrain a subject
Example: In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Professor Umbridge casts this spell on Magorian the centaur, binding him in ropes that wound around his torso and trapped his hands.

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Incendio!
Word Origin:
From the Latin incendere (set on fire)
Purpose: This spell is used to start a
Example: In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Arthur Weasley uses this spell to light a fire in the Dursleys’ fireplace

Legilimens!

Word Origin: From the Latin legere (to read) and mens (mind)
Purpose: This spell is used to delve into a person’s mind, and extracting memories and emotions. It is a magical means for mind-reading/for reading a person’s mind.
Example: In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Severus Snape used this spell to access Harry’s mind so as to determine how many dreams he was still having about the Department of mysteries.

Levicorpus!
Word Origin: From the Latin Levo (to lift up, raise) and Corpus (body)
Purpose: This spell was invented by Severus Snape, the Half-Blood Prince. It levitates the subject, dangling him/her upside down in mid-air, by his/her ankle.
Example:
In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Harry learns of this spell from Snape’s old Potions textbook, and casts it on Ron.

Liberacorpus!
Word Origin:
From the Latin Liber (to free) and Corpus (body)
Purpose: Severus Snape also invented this spell as a counter-jinx to Levicorpus (See above). It frees the victim from the Levicorpus jinx
Example: In Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince, Harry uses this to free Ron from the Levicorpus jinx.

Locomotor!
Word Origin:
From the Latin locus (place), and motor, which literally means “mover” or in a broader sense: an “agent or force that produces mechanical motion”
Purpose: This spell is used to move the targeted object from one place to another. It is used when a large or heavy load needs to be carried a short distance or at a walking pace. This incantation is typically followed by the name of the target object.
Example: In Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, when Professor Flitwick escorts Sybill Trelawney back to the North Tower, he uses the incantation “locomotor trunk” to levitate and carry her trunks to her tower room.

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Locomotor Mortis!
Word Origin: From the Latin words Locus (place, position), Motio (to move), and Mortis (death)
Purpose: This is the incantation for the Leg-Locker Curse, which immobilizes a victim by locking his/ her legs together.
Example: In Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, Draco Malfoy cast this spell on Neville Longbottom, who then had to hop his way back to Gryffindor Tower

Lumos!
Word Origin:
From the Latin luma (radiant energy, light)
Purpose: This is one of the simplest, most widely used spells. It causes the tip of the spell-caster’s wand to glow brightly. The incantation Nox! is used to put the light out.
Example: In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Dumbledore casts this spell to conjure a flashlight-like beam of light when he was looking for Mr. Crouch.

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