Olympic Games Track & Field History: Men’s Pole Vault Final, 1896-2012

 

The pole vault is one of the 12 original track and field events introduced at the inaugural Olympic Games in 1896. Athletes representing Australia, the Commonwealth of Independent States, France, the German Democratic Republic, Poland, the Soviet Union, and the United States have won the event. Americans have won the Olympic pole vault final 19 times, the most by any nation. After a bronze medal in 1948, Bob Richards (United States) won the event twice in 1952 and 1956, the most wins by a single performer. Other gold medalists who won an additional medal include Bob Seagren (United States) with gold in 1968 and silver in 1972; Wolfgang Nordwig (German Democratic Republic) with gold in 1972 and bronze in 1968; and Tadeuswz Slusarski (Poland) with gold in 1976 and silver in 1980.

Seven (7) athletes have won more than 1 medal in the event. Bob Richards (United States) leads the individual medal count with 3 (2 gold, 1 bronze), followed by Bruno Soderstrom (Sweden) with 3 (2 silver, 1 bronze), Bob Seagren (United States) with 2 (1 gold, 1 silver), Tadeuswz Slusarki (Poland) with 2 (1 gold, 1 silver), Wolfgang Nordwig (German Democratic Republic) with 2 (1 gold, 1 bronze), Shuhei Nishida (Japan) with 2 silver, and Ed Glover (United States) with 2 bronze medals.

Twenty (20) nations/teams have won medals in the Olympic pole vault final. The United States leads the medal count with 44 (19 gold, 13 silver, 12 bronze), followed by Germany with 5 (2 silver, 3 bronze), France with 4 gold, Soviet Union with 4 (1 gold, 1 silver, 2 bronze), Poland with 3 (2 gold, 1 silver medal), Finland with 3 (2 silver, 1 bronze), Japan with 3 (2 silver, 1 bronze), Russia with 3 (2 silver, 1 bronze), Sweden with 3 (1 silver, 2 bronze), Greece with 3 bronze, the Commonwealth of Independent States with 2 (1 gold, 1 silver), the German Democratic Republic with 2 (1 gold, 1 bronze), Australia with 1 gold, Denmark with 1 silver, Federal Republic of Germany with 1 silver, Canada with1 bronze, Spain with 1 bronze, Italy with 1 bronze, Norway with 1 bronze, and Ukraine with 1 bronze.

Thirty-two (32) nations have scored points by placing in the Olympic pole vault final. The United States leads scoring with 442.5 points, followed by France (83), Germany (65), Soviet Union (49), Finland (45), Sweden (45),Russia (43), Greece (39.5), Poland (38), Japan (36), Canada (20), Commonwealth of Independent States (18), Australia (17), Federal Republic of Germany (17), Denmark (16), the German Democratic Republic (16), Denmark (16), Norway (13), Hungary (10), Italy (7), Spain (6), Ukraine (6), Kazakhstan (5), Puerto Rico (5), Great Britain (4), Czechoslovakia (4), Belarus (3), Brazil (3), Belgium (2), South Africa (2), Switzerland (2), Israel (2), Czech Republic (1).

(Points for Place: 1st=10 points; 2nd =8 points; 3rd=6 points; 4th=5 points; 5th =4 points; 6th=3 points; 7th=2 points; 8th=1 point)

From 1956 to 1964, both the Federal Republic of Germany (West Germany) and the German Democratic Republic (East Germany) competed as a single team. From 1968 to 1988, they competed separately, reuniting as a single German team in 1992, after German reunification in 1991.

Following the breakup of the Soviet Union in 1991, the former Soviet Socialist Republics, expect for Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania, competed as the Commonwealth of Independent States, or the “Unified Team” in 1992.

World and Olympic records noted are the records immediately before the final, including marks established in the qualifying rounds.

1896 Athens (April 10)

World Record: 3.49 meters (11 feet 5.25 inches) Walter Rodenbaugh

1, William Welles Hoyt (United States) 3.30 meters (10 feet 10 inches) OR

2, Albert Tyler (United States) 3.20 meters (10 feet 6 inches)

3, Evangelos Damaskos (Greece) 2.60 meters (8 feet 6.25 inches)

3, Ioannis Theodoropoulos (Greece) 2.60 meters (8 feet 6.25 inches)

5, Vasilios Xydas (Greece) 2.40 meters (7 feet 10.5 inches)


1900 Paris (July 15)

World Record: 3.61 meters (11 feet 10.5 inches) Raymond Clapp

Olympic Record: 3.30 meters (10 feet 10 inches) William Welles Hoyt (United States) April 10, 1896

1, Irving Baxter (United States) 3.30 meters (10 feet 10 inches) =OR

2, Meredith Colket (United States) 3.25 meters (10 feet 8 inches)

3, Carl-Albert Andersen (Norway) 3.20 meters (10 feet 6 inches)

4, Emile Goutier (France) 3.10 meters (10 feet 2 inches)

4, Jakab Kauser (Hungary) 3.10 meters (10 feet 2 inches)

4, Eric Lemming (Sweden) 3.10 meters (10 feet 2 inches)

7, Karl Staaf (Sweden) 2.80 meters (9 feet 2.5 inches)

8, August Nilsson (Sweden) 2.60 meters (8 feet 6.25 inches)

1904 St. Louis (September 3)

World Record: 3.69 meters (12 feet 1.5 inches) Norman Dole

Olympic Record: 3.30 meters (10 feet 10 inches) William Welles Hoyt (United States) April 10, 1896; Irving Baxter (United States) July 15, 1900

1, Charles Dvorak (United States) 3.50 meters (11 feet 5.75 inches) OR

2, LeRoy Samse (United States) 3.35 meters (10 feet 11.75 inches)

3, Lou Wilkins (United States) 3.35 meters (10 feet 11.75 inches)

4, Ward McLanahan (United States) 3.35 meters (10 feet 11.75 inches)

5, Claude Allen (United States) 3.35 meters (10 feet 11.75 inches)

6, Walter Dray (United States) N/H

7, Paul Weinstein (Germany) N/H


1906 Athens (April 25)

World Record: 3.74 meters (12 feet 3.25 inches) Fernand Gonder (France)

Olympic Record: 3.50 meters (11 feet 5.75 inches) Charles Dvorak (United States) September 3, 1904

1, Fernand Gonder (France) 3.50 meters (11 feet 5.75 inches) =OR

2, Bruno Söderström (Sweden) 3.40 meters (11 feet 1.75 inches)

3, Ed Glover (United States) 3.35 meters (10 feet 11.75 inches)

4, Theodoros Makris (Greece) 3.25 meters (10 feet 8 inches)

5, Heikki Åhlman (Finland) 3.00 meters (9 feet 10 inches)

5, Georgios Banikas (Greece) 3.00 meters (9 feet 10 inches)

5, Otto Haug (Norway) 3.00 meters (9 feet 10 inches)

5, Imre Kiss (Hungary) 3.00 meters (9 feet 10 inches)

5, Stefanos Kountouriotis (Greece) 3.00 meters (9 feet 10 inches)


1908 London (July 24)

World Record: 3.90 meters (12 feet 9.5 inches) Walter Dray

Olympic Record: 3.50 meters (11 feet 5.75 inches) Charles Dvorak (United States) September 3, 1904; Fernand Gonder (France) April 25, 1906

1, Edward Cooke (United States) 3.71 meters (12 feet 2 inches) OR

1, Alfred “A.C.” Gilbert (United States) 3.71 meters (12 feet 2 inches) OR

3, Ed Archibald (Canada) 3.58 meters (11 feet 9 inches)

3, Charles Jacobs (United States) 3.58 meters (11 feet 9 inches)

3, Bruno Söderström (Sweden) 3.58 meters (11 feet 9 inches)

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6, Georgios Banikas (Greece) 3.50 meters (11 feet 5.75 inches)

6, Samuel Bellah (United States) 3.50 meters (11 feet 5.75 inches)

8, Karoly Szathmary (Hungary) 3.35 meters (10 feet 11.75 inches)


1912 Stockholm (July 12)

World Record: 4.02 meters (13 feet 2.25 inches) Marcus Wright (United States) June 8, 1912

Olympic Record: 3.71 meters (12 feet 2 inches) Edward Cooke (United States) July 24, 1908; Alfred Gilbert (United States) July 24, 1908

1, Harry Babcock (United States) 3.95 meters (12 feet 11.5 inches) OR

2, Frank Nelson (United States) 3.85 meters (12 feet 7.5 inches)

3, Marcus Wright (United States) 3.85 meters (12 feet 7.5 inches)

6, William Happeny (Canada) 3.80 meters (12 feet 5.5 inches)

4, Frank Murphy (United States) 3.85 meters (12 feet 7.5 inches)

5, Bertil Uggla (Sweden) 3.80 meters (12 feet 5.5 inches)

7, Samuel Bellah (United States) 3.75 meters (12 feet 3.5 inches)

8, Frank Coyle (United States) 3.65 meters (11 feet 11.75 inches)

8, Gordon Dukes (United States) 3.65 meters (11 feet 11.75 inches)

8, William Fritz (United States) 3.65 meters (11 feet 11.75 inches)


1920 Antwerp (August 20)

World Record: 4.02 meters (13 feet 2.25 inches) Marcus Wright (United States) June 8, 1912

Olympic Record: 3.95 meters (12 feet 11.5 inches) Harry Babcock (United States) July 12, 1912

1, Frank Foss (United States) 4.09 meters (13 feet 5 inches) WR, OR

2, Henry Petersen (Denmark) 3.70 meters (12 feet 1.5 inches)

3, Edwin Myers (United States) 3.60 meters (11 feet 9.75 inches)

4, Edward Knourek (United States) 3.60 meters (11 feet 9.75 inches)

5, Ernfrid Rydberg (Sweden) 3.60 meters (11 feet 9.75 inches)

6, Laurits Jorgensen (Denmark) 3.60 meters (11 feet 9.75 inches)

7, Eldon Jenne (United States) 3.60 meters (11 feet 9.75 inches)

8, Georg Hogstrom (Sweden) 3.50 meters (11 feet 5.75 inches)


1924 Paris (July 10)

World Record: 4.21 meters (13 feet 9.75 inches) Charles Hoff (Norway) July 22, 1923

Olympic Record: 4.09 meters (13 feet 5 inches) Frank Foss (United States) August 20, 1920

1, Lee Barnes (United States) 3.95 meters (12 feet 11.5 inches)

2, Glenn Graham (United States) 3.95 meters (12 feet 11.5 inches)

3, James Brooker (United States) 3.90 meters (12 feet 9.5 inches)

4, Henry Petersen (Denmark) 3.90 meters (12 feet 9.5 inches)

5, Victor Pickard (Canada) 3.80 meters (12 feet 5.5 inches)

6, Ralph Spearow (United States) 3.70 meters (12 feet 1.5 inches)

7, Maurice Henrijean (Belgium) 3.66 meters (12 feet 0 inches)

1928 Amsterdam (August 1)

World Record: 4.30 meters (14 feet 1.25 inches) Lee Barnes (United States) April 28, 1928

Olympic Record: 4.09 meters (13 feet 5 inches) Frank Foss (United States) August 20, 1920

1, Sabin Carr (United States) 4.20 meters (13 feet 9.25 inches) OR

2, William Droegemuller (United States) 4.10 meters (13 feet 5.25 inches)

3, Charles McGinnis (United States) 3.95 meters (12 feet 11.5 inches)

4, Victor Pickard (Canada) 3.95 meters (12 feet 11.5 inches)

5, Lee Barnes (United States) 3.95 meters (12 feet 11.5 inches)

6, Yonataro Nakazawa (Japan) 3.90 meters (12 feet 9.5 inches)

7, Henry Linblad (Sweden) 3.90 meters (12 feet 9.5 inches)

8, Janos Karlovits (Hungary) 3.80 meters (12 feet 5.5 inches)


1932 Los Angeles (August 3)

World Record: 4.37 meters (14 feet 4 inches) William Graber (United States) June 16, 1932

Olympic Record: 4.20 meters (13 feet 9.25 inches) Sabin Carr (United States) August 1, 1928

1, William Miller (United States) 4.31 meters (14 feet 1.75 inches) OR

2, Shuhei Nishida (Japan) 4.30 meters (14 feet 1.25 inches)

3, George Jefferson (United States) 4.20 meters (13 feet 9.25 inches)

4, William Graber (United States) 4.15 meters (13 feet 7.25 inches)

5, Shizuo Mochizuki (Japan) 4.00 meters (13 feet 1.5 inches)

6, Lucio de Castro (Brazil) 3.90 meters (12 feet 9.5 inches)

7, Peter Chlentos (Greece) 3.75 meters (12 feet 3.5 inches)


1936 Berlin (August 5)

World Record: 4.43 meters (14 feet 6.50 inches) George Varoff (United States) July 4, 1936

Olympic Record: 4.31 meters (14 feet 1.75 inches) Sabin Carr (United States) August 3, 1932

1, Earle Meadows (United States) 4.35 meters (14 feet 3.5 inches) OR

2, Shuhei Nishida (Japan) 4.25 meters (13 feet 11.25 inches)

3, Sueo Oe (Japan) 4.25 meters (13 feet 11.25 inches)

4, William Sefton (United States) 4.25 meters (13 feet 11.25 inches)

5, William Graber (United States) 4.15 meters (13 feet 7.25 inches)

6, Kiyoshi Adachi (Japan) 4.00 meters (13 feet 1.5 inches)

6, Syl Apps (Canada) 4.00 meters (13 feet 1.5 inches)

6, Péter Bácsalmási (Hungary) 4.00 meters (13 feet 1.5 inches)

6, Josef Haunzwickel (Austria) 4.00 meters (13 feet 1.5 inches)

6, Danilo Innocenti (Italy) 4.00 meters (13 feet 1.5 inches)

6, Jan Korejs (Czechoslovakia) 4.00 meters (13 feet 1.5 inches)

6, Bo Ljungberg (Sweden) 4.00 meters (13 feet 1.5 inches)

6, Alfred Proksch (Austria) 4.00 meters (13 feet 1.5 inches)

6, Wilhelm Schneider (Poland) 4.00 meters (13 feet 1.5 inches)

6, Dick Webster (Great Britain/England) 4.00 meters (13 feet 1.5 inches)

6, Viktor Zsuffka (Hungary) 4.00 meters (13 feet 1.5 inches)


1948 London (August 2)

World Record: 4.77 meters Cornelius Warmerdam (United States) May 23, 1942

Olympic Record: 4.35 meters (14 feet 3.5 inches) Earle Meadows (United States) August 5, 1936

1, Guinn Smith (United States) 4.30 meters (14 feet 1.25 inches)

2, Erkki Kataja (Finland) 4.20 meters (13 feet 9.25 inches)

3, Robert Richards (United States) 4.20 meters (13 feet 9.25 inches)

4, Erling Kaas (Norway) 4.10 meters (13 feet 5.25 inches)

5, Ragnar Lundberg (Sweden) 4.10 meters (13 feet 5.25 inches)

6, Richmond Morcom (United States) 3.95 meters (12 feet 11.5 inches)

7, Hugo Gollors (Sweden) 3.95 meters (12 feet 11.5 inches)

8, Valto Olenius (Finland) 3.95 meters (12 feet 11.5 inches)


1952 Helsinki (July 22)

World Record: 4.77 meters (15 feet 7.75 inches) Cornelius Warmerdam (United States) May 23, 1942

Olympic Record: 4.35 meters (14 feet 3.5 inches) Earle Meadows (United States) August 5, 1936

1, Robert Richards (United States) 4.55 meters (14 feet 11 inches) OR

2, Donald Laz (United States) 4.50 meters (14 feet 9 inches)

3, Ragnar Lundberg (Sweden) 4.40 meters (14 feet 5.25 inches)

4, Petro Denysenko (Soviet Union/Ukraine) 4.40 meters (14 feet 5.25 inches)

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5, Valto Olenius (Finland) 4.30 meters (14 feet 1.25 inches)

6, Bunkichi Sawada (Japan) 4.20 meters (13 feet 9.25 inches)

7, Vladimir Brazhnik (Soviet Union/Ukraine) 4.20 meters (13 feet 9.25 inches)

8, Viktor Knyazev (Soviet Union/Russia) 4.20 meters (13 feet 9.25 inches)


1956 Melbourne (November 26)

World Record: 4.77 meters (15 feet 7.75 inches) Cornelius Warmerdam (United States) May 23, 1942

Olympic Record: 4.55 meters (14 feet 11 inches) Robert Richards (United States) July 22, 1952

1, Robert Richards (United States) 4.56 meters (14 feet 11.5 inches) OR

2, Robert Gutowski (United States) 4.53 meters (14 feet 10.25 inches)

3, Georgios Roubanis (Greece) 4.50 meters (14 feet 9 inches)

4, George Mattos (United States) 4.35 meters (14 feet 3.5 inches)

5, Ragnar Lundberg (Sweden) 4.25 meters (13 feet 11.25 inches)

6, Zenon Wazny (Poland) 4.25 meters (13 feet 11.25 inches)

7, Eeles Landstrom (Finland) 4.25 meters (13 feet 11.25 inches)

8, Manfred Preussger (Germany/German Democratic Republic) 4.25 meters (13 feet 11.25 inches)

1960 Rome (September 7)

World Record: 4.80 meters (15 feet 9.25 inches) Donald Bragg (United States) July 2, 1960

Olympic Record: 4.56 meters (14 feet 11.5 inches) Robert Richards (United States) November 26, 1956

1, Donald Bragg (United States) 4.70 meters (15 feet 5 inches) OR

2, Ronald Morris (United States) 4.60 meters (15 feet 1 inch)

3, Eeles Landstrom (Finland) 4.55 meters (14 feet 11 inches)

4, Rolando Cruz (Puerto Rico) 4.55 meters (14 feet 11 inches)

5, Gunter Malcher (Germany/German Democratic Republic) 4.50 meters (14 feet 9 inches)

6, Igor Petrenko (Soviet Union/Ukraine) 4.50 meters (14 feet 9 inches)

7, Matti Sutinen (Finland) 4.50 meters (14 feet 9 inches)

8, Rudolf Tomasek (Czechoslovakia) 4.50 meters (14 feet 9 inches)


1964 Tokyo (October 17)

World Record: 5.28 meters (17 feet 4 inches) Frederick Hansen (United States) July 25, 1964

Olympic Record: 4.70 meters (15 feet 5 inches) Donald Bragg (United States) September 7, 1960

1, Frederick Hansen (United States) 5.10 meters (16 feet 8.5 inches) OR

2, Wolfgang Reinhardt (Germany/Federal Republic of Germany) 5.05 meters (16 feet 6.25 inches)

3, Klaus Lehnertz (Germany/Federal Republic of Germany) 5.00 meters (16 feet 4.75 inches)

4, Manfred Preussger (Germany/German Democratic Republic) 5.00 meters (16 feet 4.75 iches)

5, Hennady Blyznetsov (Soviet Union/Ukraine) 4.95 meters (16 feet 2.75 inches)

6, Rudolf Tomasek (Czechoslovakia) 4.90 meters (16 feet 0.75 inch)

7, Pentti Nikula (Finland) 4.90 meters (16 feet 0.75 inch)

8, Billy Pemelton (United States) 4.80 meters (15 feet 9.25 inches)


1968 Mexico City (October 16)

World Record: 5.41 meters (17 feet 9 inches) (A) Bob Seagren (United States) September 12, 1968

Olympic Record: 5.10 meters (16 feet 8.5 inches) Frederick Hansen (United States) October 16, 1968

1, Bob Seagren (United States) 5.40 meters (17 feet 8.5 inches) OR

2, Claus Schiprowski (Federal Republic of Germany) 5.40 meters (17 feet 8.5 inches) OR

3, Wolfgang Nordwig (German Democratic Republic) 5.40 meters (17 feet 8.5 inches) OR

4, Christos Papanicolau (Greece) 5.35 meters (17 feet 6.5 inches)

5, John Pennel (United States) 5.35 meters (17 feet 6.5 inches)

6, Hennady Blyznetsov (Soviet Union/Ukraine) 5.30 meters (17 feet 4.5 inches)

7, Herve D’Encausse (France) 5.25 meters (17 feet 2.25 inches)

8, Heinfried Engel (Federal Republic of Germany) 5.20 meters (17 feet 0.25 inches)


1972 Munich (September 2)

World Record: 5.63 meters (18 feet 5.25 inches) Bob Seagren (United States) July 2, 1972

Olympic Record: 5.40 meters (17 feet 8.5 inches) (A) Bob Seagren (United States) October 16, 1968; Claus Schiprowski (Federal Republic of Germany) October 16, 1968; Wolfgang Nordwig (German Democratic Republic) 5.40 meters (17 feet 8.5 inches) October 16, 1968

1, Wolfgang Nordwig (German Democratic Republic) 5.50 meters (18 feet 0.5 inch)

2, Bob Seagren (United States) 5.40 meters (17 feet 8.5 inches)

3, Jan Johnson (United States) 5.35 meters (17 feet 6.5 inches)

4, Reinhard Kuretsky (Federal Republic of Germany) 5.30 meters (17 feet 4.5 inches)

5, Bruce Simpson (Canada) 5.20 meters (17 feet 0.25 inches)

6, Volker Ohl (Federal Republic of Germany) 5.20 meters (17 feet 0.25 inches)

7, Hans Lagerqvist (Sweden) 5.20 meters (17 feet 0.25 inches)

8, Francois Tracanelli (France) 5.10 meters (16 feet 8.5 inches)


1976 Montreal (July 26)

World Record: 5.70 meters (18 feet 8.25 inches) David Roberts (United States) June 22, 1976

Olympic Record: 5.50 meters (18 feet 0.5 inch) Wolfgang Nordwig (German Democratic Republic) September 2, 1972

1, Tadeuswz Slusarski (Poland) 5.50 meters (18 feet 0.5 inch) =OR

2, Antti Kalliomaki (Finland) 5.50 meters (18 feet 0.5 inch)

3, David Roberts (United States) 5.50 meters (18 feet 0.5 inch)

4, Patrick Abada (France) 5.45 meters (17 feet 10.5 inches)

5, Wojciech Buciarski (Poland) 5.45 meters (17 feet 10.5 inches)

6, Earl Bell (United States) 5.45 meters (17 feet 10.5 inches)

7, Jean-Michel Bellot (France) 5.45 meters (17 feet 10.5 inches)

8, Itsuo Takanezawa (Japan) 5.40 meters (17 feet 8.5 inches)


1980 Moscow (July 10)

World Record: 5.77 meters (18 feet 11 inches) Philippe Houvion (France) July 17, 1980

Olympic Record: 5.50 meters (18 feet 0.5 inch) Wolfgang Nordwig (German Democratic Republic) September 2, 1972; Tadeuswz Slusarski (Poland) July 26, 1976; Antti Kalliomaki July 26, 1976; David Roberts (United States) July 26, 1976

1, Wladyslaw Kozakiewicz (Poland) 5.78 meters (18 feet 11.5 inches) WR, OR

2, Tadeuswz Slusarski (Poland) 5.65 meters (18 feet 6.5 inches)

3, Konstantin Volkov (Soviet Union/Russia) 5.65 meters (18 feet 6.5 inches)

4, Philippe Houvion (France) 5.65 meters (18 feet 6.5 inches)

5, Jean-Michel Bellot (France) 5.60 meters (18 feet 4.5 inches)

6, Mariusz Klimczyk (Poland) 5.55 meters (18 feet 2.5 inches)

7, Thierry Vigneron (France) 5.45 meters (17 feet 10.5 inches)

8, Sergei Kulibaba (Soviet Union/Kazakhstan) 5.45 meters (17 feet 10.5 inches)


1984 Los Angeles (August 8)

World Record: 5.90 meters (19 feet 4.25 inches) Sergey Bubka (Soviet Union/Ukraine) July 13, 1984

Olympic Record: 5.78 meters (18 feet 11.5 inches) Wladyslaw Kozakiewicz (Poland) July 10, 1980

1, Pierre Quinon (France) 5.75 meters (18 feet 10.25 inches)

2, Mike Tully (United States) 5.65 meters (18 feet 6.5 inches)

3, Earl Bell (United States) 5.60 meters (18 feet 4.5 inches)

4, Thierry Vigneron (France) 5.60 meters (18 feet 4.5 inches)

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5, Kimmo Pallonen (Finland) 5.45 meters (17 feet 10.5 inches)

6, Doug Lytle (United States) 5.60 meters (18 feet 4.5 inches)

7, Felix Bohni (Switzerland) 5.30 meters (17 feet 4.5 inches)

8, Mauro Barelia (Italy) 5.30 meters (17 feet 4.5 inches)


1988 Seoul (September 28)

World Record: 6.06 meters (19 feet 10.5 inches) Sergey Bubka (Soviet Union/Ukraine) July 10, 1988

Olympic Record: 5.78 meters (18 feet 11.5 inches) Wladyslaw Kozakiewicz (Poland) July 10, 1980

1, Sergey Bubka (Soviet Union/Ukraine) 5.90 meters (19 feet 4.25 inches) OR

2, Rodion Gataullin (Soviet Union/Uzbekistan) 5.85 meters (19 feet 2.25 inches)

3, Grigory Yegorov (Soviet Union/Kazakhstan) 5.80 meters (19 meters 0.25 inch)

4, Earl Bell (United States) 5.70 meters (18 feet 8.25 inches)

5, Philippe Collet (France) 5.70 meters (18 feet 8.25 inches)

5, Thierry Vigneron (France) 5.70 meters (18 feet 8.25 inches)

7, Istvan Bagyula (Hungary) 5.60 meters (18 feet 4.5 inches)

8, Philippe D’Encausse (France) 5.60 meters (18 feet 4.5 inches)


1992 Barcelona (August 7)

World Record: 6.11 meters (20 feet 0.5 inch) Sergey Bubka (Soviet Union/Ukraine) June 13, 1992

Olympic Record: 5.90 meters (19 feet 4.25 inches) Sergey Bubka (Soviet Union/Ukraine) September 28, 1988

1, Maxim Tarasov (Commonwealth of Independent States/Russia) 5.80 meters (19 meters 0.25 inch)

2, Igor Trandenkov (Commonwealth of Independent States/Russia) 5.80 meters (19 meters 0.25 inch)

3, Javier Garcia (Spain) 5.75 meters (18 feet 10.25 inches)

4, Kory Tarpenning (United States) 5.75 meters (18 feet 10.25 inches)

5, David Volz (United States) 5.65 meters (18 feet 6.5 inches)

6, Asko Peltoniemi (Finland) 5.60 meters (18 feet 4.5 inches)

7, Philippe Collet (France) 5.55 meters (18 feet 2.5 inches)

8, Yevgeny Krasnov (Israel) 5.40 meters (17 feet 8.5 inches)


1996 Atlanta (August 2)

World Record: 6.14 meters (20 feet 1.75 inches) (A) Sergey Bubka (Ukraine) July 31, 1994

Olympic Record: 5.90 meters (19 feet 4.25 inches) Sergey Bubka (Soviet Union/Ukraine) September 28, 1988

1, Jean Galfione (France) 5.92 meters (19 feet 5 inches) OR

2, Igor Trandenkov (Russia) 5.92 meters (19 feet 5 inches)

3, Andrei Tivontchik (Germany) 5.92 meters (19 feet 5 inches)

4, Igor Potapovich (Kazakhstan) 5.86 meters (19 feet 2.75 inches)

5, Pyotr Bochkaryov (Russia) 5.86 meters (19 feet 2.75 inches)

6, Dmitriy Markov (Belarus) 5.86 meters (19 feet 2.75 inches)

7, Tim Lobinger (Germany) 5.80 meters (19 meters 0.25 inch)

8, Lawrence Johnson (United States) 5.70 meters (18 feet 8.25 inches)


2000 Sydney (September 29)

World Record: 6.14 meters (20 feet 1.75 inches) (A) Sergey Bubka (Ukraine) July 31, 1994

Olympic Record: 5.92 meters (19 feet 5 inches) Jean Galfione (France) August 2, 1996

1, Nick Hysong (United States) 5.90 meters (19 feet 4.25 inches)

2, Lawrence Johnson (United States) 5.90 meters (19 feet 4.25 inches)

3, Maksim Tarasov (Russia) 5.90 meters (19 feet 4.25 inches)

4, Michael Stolle (Germany) 5.90 meters (19 feet 4.25 inches)

5, Viktor Tchistiakov (Australia) 5.80 meters (19 meters 0.25 inch)

6, Dmitriy Markov (Australia) 5.80 meters (19 meters 0.25 inch)

7, Okkert Brits (South Africa) 5.80 meters (19 meters 0.25 inch)

8, Daniel Ecker (Germany) 5.80 meters (19 meters 0.25 inch)


2004 Athens (August 27)

World Record: 6.14 meters (20 feet 1.75 inches) (A) Sergey Bubka (Ukraine) July 31, 1994

Olympic Record: 5.92 meters (19 feet 5 inches) Jean Galfione (France) August 2, 1996

1, Timothy Mack (United States) 5.95 meters (19 feet 6.25 inches) OR

2, Toby Stevenson (United States) 5.90 meters (19 feet 4.25 inches)

3, Giuseppe Gibilisco (Italy) 5.85 meters (19 feet 2.25 inches)

4, Igor Pavlov (Russia) 5.80 meters (19 meters 0.25 inch)

5, Daniel Ecker (Germany) 5.75 meters (18 feet 10.25 inches)

6, Lars Boergeling (Germany) 5.75 meters (18 feet 10.25 inches)

7, Derek Miles (United States) 5.75 meters (18 feet 10.25 inches)

8, Aleksander Averbukh (Israel) 5.65 meters (18 feet 6.5 inches)


2008 Beijing (August 22)

World Record: 6.14 meters (20 feet 1.75 inches) (A) Sergey Bubka (Ukraine) July 31, 1994

Olympic Record: 5.95 meters (19 feet 6.25 inches) Timothy Mack (United States) August 27, 2004

1, Steve Hooker (Australia) 5.96 meters (19 feet 6.5 inches) OR

2, Evgeny Lukyanenko (Russia) 5.85 meters (19 feet 2.25 inches)

3, Denys Yurchenko (Ukraine) 5.70 meters (18 feet 8.25 inches)

4, Derek Miles (United States) 5.70 meters (18 feet 8.25 inches)

5, Dmitry Starodubtsev (Russia) 5.70 meters (18 feet 8.25 inches)

6, Daniel Ecker (Germany) 5.70 meters (18 feet 8.25 inches)

7, Jerome Clavier (France) 5.60 meters (18 feet 4.5 inches)

8, Raphael Holzdeppe (Germany) 5.60 meters (18 feet 4.5 inches)


2012 London (August)

World Record: 6.14 meters (20 feet 1.75 inches) (A) Sergey Bubka (Ukraine) July 31, 1994

Olympic Record: 5.96 meters (19 feet 6.5 inches) Steve Hooker (Australia) August 22, 2008

1, Renaud Lavillenie (France) 5.97 meters (19 feet 7 inches) OR

2, Björn Otto (Germany) 5.91 meters (19 feet 4.75 inches)

3, Raphael Holzdeppe (Germany) 5.91 meters (19 feet 4.75 inches)

4, Dmitry Starodubtsev (Russia) 5.75 meters (18 feet 10.25 inches)

5, Steve Lewis (Great Britain) 5.75 meters (18 feet 10.25 inches)

5, Yevgeniy Lukyanenko (Russia) 5.75 meters (18 feet 10.25 inches)

7, Kostas Filippidis (Greece) 5.65 meters (18 feet 6.5 inches)

8, Jan Kudlička (Czech Republic) 5.65 meters (18 feet 6.5 inches)


References:

Athletics Men’s Pole Vault Final, Sports Reference/Olympic Sports;

International Association of Athletic Federations, IAAF Statistics Handbook Daegu 2011, Part IV (IAAF Media & Public Relations Department, 2011);

International Association of Athletic Federations, IAAF Statistics Handbook, Games of the XXX Olympiad, London 2012, Part I (IAAF Media & Public Relations Department, 2012);

International Association of Athletic Federations, IAAF Statistics Handbook, Games of the XXX Olympiad, London 2012, Part II (IAAF Media & Public Relations Department, 2012);

Quercetani, R.L., A World History of Track and Field Athletics, 1864-1964 (London: Oxford University Press, 1964);

Wallechinsky, David, and Jaime Loucky, The Complete Book of the Olympics: 2012 Edition (London: Aurum Press, 2012).